Sunday Foraging

Years ago when I lived in the city, I shopped in local bulk food stores. I purchased all sorts of herbs, tinctures, and salves in the hopes of living a more holistic lifestyle. I remember my grandmother making “black”  and “tar” salves when I was a kid, but her recipe was lost– she passed away before I graduated from high school. My curiosity led me to  experiment with everything from laundry detergent to toothpaste. Some things worked– I still use simple carpet and window cleaners. Others not so much– laundry detergent specially made for HE washers and hard water simply works better for us. After a lot of experimentation, I also make all of the soap, salves, and skin care products that me and my family use throughout the year, and use many holistic methods with our livestock.

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Goldenrod in various stages of bloom

Now that I live on a farm with woodlands, I am able to forage many of the plants that I need to make the medicines and skin care products that we use. Given my interest in natural dying, I have been pleased to learn that many of the plants and flowers that I forage and routinely grow are also used to dye fabric.

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Mullein– commonly used for earaches

Of course, caution must be used when foraging plants. Mother nature and the Good Lord saw fit to equip many of them with, well, deterrents. Some of my most favorite plants have thorns or irritate the skin if picked without protection. As with foraging for mushrooms or other items in the natural world, know what you’re doing before you hurt yourself! Due diligence and common sense are required! That being said, people have made use of woodland plants since before written language, so short of a woodland mentor, a good pocket plant identification guide is really all that is needed.

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Rose hips ready for harvest

Rose hips have been used for a millennia to ward off and treat colds. During WW2, the British government enacted “The Rose Hip Collection Campaign,” wherein it compelled its citizens to collect and use rose hips to ward off scurvy during its time of food rationing. There is some anecdotal evidence that rose hip tea lessens the effects of arthritis, but that hasn’t been proven in clinical trials.

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The ubiquitous stinging nettle in flower

We drink nettle tea during the winter for the vitamin boost. Some folks make pesto from it, but we’re not huge pesto fans around here so we stick to tea. Mixed with a good loose leaf Earl Grey, it’s wonderful on a cold winter evening.

The bees are out in full force, busy stocking the hive in preparation for winter. They pull white pollen from nettles. Isn’t that something?

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Worker bee harvesting white pollen from nettle flowers

I can find no better way to appreciate the changing seasons than by taking a slow walk in the woods.

-CW

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